Let’s chat more on layout and organization… and language.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/15/us/politics/leading-senate-republicans-set-to-block-hagel.html?pagewanted=2&_r=0&hp

 

In a world where filibusters and political issues are primarily only noted by those interested in such topics, where is, again, the line of importance drawn? At some point, I want to answer this question, and figure out what makes people read… (and not!).

 

The above article uses a fairly basic structure, but breaks down a comparatively complex issue in doing so. The average person could then understand what is going on in the US Senate with little to no knowledge of the in depth issues. Is this a good thing? We say that reporters are urged to write at a 6th grade reading level. 

Perhaps people are on to something. 

News is supposed to inform everyone. There are of course, discourse communities and interest groups, but I would argue that in something such as The New York Times, one is given the opportunity to reach nearly anyone… meaning the dry, the boring, and the complex, should be transformed  into  a state otherwise.

This article does an excellent job at doing this. The line action is easy to follow information wise, and even though the ideas are very political, almost anyone could read this article and understand the implications of the matter (you know… filibusters? Those are kind of a big, and annoying, deal). It gives insight into things that are actually going on in the country, and and allows people to be more knowledgeable, strictly through making the information accessible based on how it is written. This access to knowledge allow people to be a bigger part in democracy… you know, what our country runs on?

Amazing what a little well written news can do. 

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